Wednesday Update – November 24, 2010

Here are some of the stories of importance this week.

Canada:

  • ‘Cookiegate’ continues to make headlines. Alberta Health Services CEO Stephen Duckett refused to answer reporters’ questions, stating he was busy eating a cookie. Now there are two sides to this. First of all, Alberta’s health system is a mess, and Duckett does have serious issues to deal with. But at the same time, when you are chasing a man down the street, on his own time, and he does not want to answer your question, then leave him alone! Unfortunately, Duckett played into the media’s hand, and now the public wants his head. This has overshadowed the real issues that need to be dealt with though. Read more here.
  • Quebec Premier and Liberal leader Jean Charest is fighting to keep his minority government alive. The party is expected to survive a confidence motion proposed by the opposition Parti Quebecois. The Charest government has been dealing with allegations of wrongdoings and scandals, which have hurt their credibility in government. Read more here.
  • Ontario Premier and Liberal leader Dalton McGuinty appears to be having similar problems to Charest in Quebec. McGuinty has a majority and thus his government is safe, but polls show if an election were to be held, the party would lose to the Progressive Conservatives. This comes at the same time as an announcement which states Ontario power bills could double in the next twenty years. Read more here and here.
  • The mayoral race in Iqaluit has four people running. In case you don’t know, Iqaluit is the capital of Nunavut, Canada’s newest territory. The race is to replace incumbent Elisapee Sheutiapik who is not seeking reelection. There is also one council seat up for grabs. Residents vote on December 13. Iqaluit has a population of just over 6,000. Read more here.

United States:

  • The issue of assisted suicide was brought up, after a California man killed his wife of almost seventy years. The woman suffered from dementia and was unable to take care of herself in any way. The husband took care of her full time, before moving her into an assisted living facility. It is alleged he shot and killed her, to spare her the pain and shame she was enduring. Some have questioned whether assisted suicide should be allowed for elderly or terminally ill patients, so they may die on their own terms. Read more here.
  • The outrage over TSA pat downs and airport screening continues. Some passengers will be boycotting air travel today and tomorrow, which happen to be some of the busiest days for holiday travellers. People are complaining, blah, blah, blah. I am not even going to give a link to read more, because the stories are absurd!

World:

  • South Korea is calling for severe retaliation after attacks from North Korea. The artillery attacks reignite tensions between the neighbours, and the loss of civilian life is particularly troubling. The international community is calling for restraint, but South Korea, which lost two soldiers, sees it as a clear provocation and violation. Read more here.
  • The death toll after a stampede in Cambodia is nearing 400. A festival turned to tragedy, as the crowd panicked and tried to rush across a small bridge. Many were trampled or fell off the sides. The cause of the stampede is still unknown and the Cambodian Prime Minister is calling it one of the worst tragedies the country has seen. Read more here.
  • Hope is fading after a coal mine explosion in New Zealand trapped 29 workers underground. It is too dangerous for human crews to go down, but two robots have arrived to try and enter. The men have drinking water, but likely not enough food. In addition, they are likely spread out in the mine. No contact has been made with the men yet. Read more here UPDATE: Reports have emerged that all 29 miners have tragically died as a result of the explosion. Read the details here.
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About Chris James

A student of political science at a Canadian University sharing stories of interest on Canadian and American political and social issues.

Posted on November 24, 2010, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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